Engine gasket removal

Throughout my years of turning spanners ive ran into several degrees of difficulty in removing gaskets from mating surfaces.

Occasionally I get lucky and they come right off with no other work - more often than not it’s necessary to get a little more involved.

I tend to avoid razor blades, as they can sometimes do more harm than good, although I do keep one handy for the times i need it.

What I have found that works well, for really stuck on gaskets, is acetone or carb/brake cleaner to loosen the gasket a bit. remove as much as possible with a blunt blade or scraper, brass/copper/aluminum work well here as it they shouldn’t cause any harm to the harder cast mating surface.

Once you have the leftovers thin enough to your liking, grab an oil stone - this is a tip I picked up on in a few older dirt bike service manuals. I found a fine/rough coarsed knife sharpening stone at harbor freight for $5 that works very well on moped sized engine applications. Add a few drops of oil to the ‘fine’ side of the stone, and gently rub the remaining gasket away.

This technique is also great for removing imperfections in mating surfaces (the PO used a flathead to pull the clutch cover, see it all the time!)

The key is to keep your stone flat and when possible span the surface you are grazing to keep things uniform.

Your mating surfaces will come out looking factory and ready for install, with peace of mind that things will seal properly.

Lapping mating surfaces on glass or granite is also a swell option, but I’ve found the oil stone is nice to get into tight or hard to reach spots.

Wrench on!

Wade

E5094890-A13D-41F8-973A-07A243A1B166.jpeg

Re: Engine gasket removal

Dirty30 Dillon /

If you're going to be flattening surfaces alot, invest in one of these.

https://www.sharpeningsupplies.com/DMT-10-Dia-Sharp-Diamond-Stone-P318.aspx?gclid=CjwKCAiAiuTfBRAaEiwA4itUqKg39VesdlVCD4Oc7YNLqPfztBOkKDA2RQNxCm8a9JQ75C7ct7StphoCej4QAvD_BwE

Won't wear like an oil stone and make things worse.i have one and flatten everything with it.

Re: Engine gasket removal

dang still no like button on this site.

I really like that! totally right on the stone, if you get a lot of use out of it it will bow, new one $5 not so bad on the wallet

investing in above though, that is righteous! Nothing like having the right tool for the job

Re: Engine gasket removal

Brandon Weiss (Detective brandon to you) /

I have a smaller DMT diamond stone i bought on amazon a few years ago, it was about $40 bucks. Works great

Re: Engine gasket removal

I break plastic knives in half and use those

colored-plastic-knife-1.jpg

Re: Engine gasket removal

todd amundson /

Rotary decal eraser for body work.

Next song.

Re: Engine gasket removal

Blaine- The artist formerly known as Plumber Crack "(OFMC)" /

Tapping stuck compressed paper gaskets with a ball peen hammer makes them shatter off like glass

Re: Engine gasket removal

dang I’m trying the plastic knife next that’s awesome

Re: Engine gasket removal

I keep a couple of old wood chisels in the box just for removing old gaskets .

Re: Engine gasket removal

Overpriced Parts /

> river 2strokes Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> dang I’m trying the plastic knife next that’s awesome

Yeah you can’t wear down the metal in any area! you get to have completely flat mating surfaces so something like plastic is perfect

Re: Engine gasket removal

I mean yea I get that - I’m sure you’ve had stuck on gaskets even a plastic knife can’t take up, Ive had them stick even after combing with a razor blade - the stone planes the surface and in a few swipes takes everything right up and your left with clean ready to go surface.

Re: Engine gasket removal

Dirty30 Dillon /

Yeah, the DMT plates are expensive, but I bought them originally for sharpening tools and flattening my waterstones, so they've just found another use.

I am a proponent of careful use of razor to remove stuck on, hardened gaskets. Of course, dexterity is really important. Plastic removal tools don't have the edge retention to get under a really stuck gasket.

Re: Engine gasket removal

Brandon Weiss (Detective brandon to you) /

> Dirty30 Dillon Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Yeah, the DMT plates are expensive, but I bought them originally for

> sharpening tools and flattening my waterstones, so they've just found

> another use.

>

> I am a proponent of careful use of razor to remove stuck on, hardened

> gaskets. Of course, dexterity is really important. Plastic removal tools

> don't have the edge retention to get under a really stuck gasket.

And i unless you really gauge and saw at it with a sharp razor blade, you wont really remove enough material to cause an issue, especially on a surface that gets sealed with something like yamabond or motoseal.

I use razorblades pretty much exclusively, i'm just careful to make sure it support it enough that it remains flat on the surface that im cleaning. Sure it makes some light scratches in the alluminum, but nothing that will leak.

Re: Engine gasket removal

You should try a nice sharp wood chisel . No worries about the tool being too flimsy or breaking and causing gauges . They provide a good handle that can be held in various positions .

I sharpen mine so the 'blade' has a small angle on one side and a longer angle on the leading side . That allows downward pressure without the cutting edge bearing that 'weight' .

If I happen to make a fair gauge , which doesn't happen very often , I mix a bit of JB Weld and fill the 'hole' , after a touch of brake cleaner to insure a good hold . Once leveled , the repair is permanent .

Re: Engine gasket removal

Dirty30 Dillon /

I don't mix my wood working tools with metal work, not worth the resharpening one ding against a steel stud.

Also, best to leave the backside of your chisel flat and just adding a secondary micro-bevel to the main bevel. Than, turn it upside down to allow angled work.

Re: Engine gasket removal

Agreed . I usually don't like to mix tool use either , but , my gasket chisels are just that .

I don't do much wood work anymore , let alone a need for a chisel while doing it .

I might have a need for some rough chisel work once in a 5 year period .

As for sharpening time wasted . Meh . It only takes a few seconds to bring any edge back .

Anyway , take or leave my offering . ;)

Re: Engine gasket removal

Kevin Bishop /

I use plastic razor blades. You can buy them at Veritas/ Lee Valley. They are a wood working company in Canada. I had one from work that I used with Goofoff for removing PL glue off a finished floor.

Re: Engine gasket removal

Dirty30 Dillon /

> Kevin Bishop Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I use plastic razor blades. You can buy them at Veritas/ Lee Valley.

> They are a wood working company in Canada. I had one from work that I

> used with Goofoff for removing PL glue off a finished floor.

WINNER, I will be ordered a set ASAP. I haven't perused LV/Veritas in awhile, guess I gotta go through the catalog

Re: Engine gasket removal

Permatex offers a plastic razor scraper. They work pretty well. You can buy 100 packs of the razors for ~$12.

Re: Engine gasket removal

never had a razor blade do enough damage that it mattered...

Re: Engine gasket removal

> Born to be WillD Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> never had a razor blade do enough damage that it mattered...

Agreed , other than having to replace them way too often due to them snapping apart . Maybe I used the wrong razor blades ?

Anyway , I leave them for shaving and cleaning glass .

Re: Engine gasket removal

> Born to be WillD Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> never had a razor blade do enough damage that it mattered...

i Guess if you only work on your own stuff then yea

Re: Engine gasket removal

And i unless you really gauge and saw at it with a sharp razor blade,

> you wont really remove enough material to cause an issue, especially on

> a surface that gets sealed with something like yamabond or motoseal.

>

> I use razorblades pretty much exclusively, i'm just careful to make sure

> it support it enough that it remains flat on the surface that im

> cleaning. Sure it makes some light scratches in the alluminum, but

> nothing that will leak.

enjoy your blades and sloppy mating surfaces

Re: Engine gasket removal

The motion pro gasket ‘knife’ works well, I just feel like some gaskets take an extra step or two to remove and the stone really did change the game for my little shop, so I thought I’d pass that along.

obviously if you can quickly remove it with another tool then you’ll probably do it that way to start - and yes small imperfections in mating surfaces are a big deal to me, I don’t like to put a brand new gasket on a surface that’s still got gasket or imperfections. or taking a blade to a crucial part of someone else’s machine - it makes no sense to go one step forward and two steps back when it could have been resolved and time/money save for all.

Re: Engine gasket removal

> river 2strokes Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> The motion pro gasket ‘knife’ works well,

The business end of that knife looks a lot like the business end of my chisels . ;)

(edited)

Re: Engine gasket removal

Brandon Weiss (Detective brandon to you) /

> river 2strokes Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> And i unless you really gauge and saw at it with a sharp razor blade,

>

> > you wont really remove enough material to cause an issue, especially

> on

>

> > a surface that gets sealed with something like yamabond or motoseal.

>

> >

>

> > I use razorblades pretty much exclusively, i'm just careful to make

> sure

>

> > it support it enough that it remains flat on the surface that im

>

> > cleaning. Sure it makes some light scratches in the alluminum, but

>

> > nothing that will leak.

>

> enjoy your blades and sloppy mating surfaces

Why so sour?

Re: Engine gasket removal

> todd amundson Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Rotary decal eraser for body work.

>

> Next song.

This was the greatest thing I have used to remove gasket material period. Not abrasive and takes it right off with no effort. I could see how an oiled stone would smith out nicks and such. Definitely agree blades and things can surely fuck up the mating surfaces.

084D608F-AA1B-47DB-A9AD-EBFB6272F320.jpeg

(edited)

Re: Engine gasket removal

that’s a sweet setup /\

things to try:

plastic knife

rotary removal

nice plate for smoothin

still loving my stone, used in on a reed valve surface yesterday, Nice and clean

Re: Engine gasket removal

Definitely buying one of those decal erasers

« Go to Topic — end of thread

Want to post in this forum? We'd love to have you join the discussion, but first:

Login or Create Account