gas tank rust

puch gas tank rust. tried vinegar and evaporust. cant use abrasives.

any ideas. also make sure you Kentucky people come out to the Halloween ride

Re: gas tank rust

Double Trouble Dan /

Re: gas tank rust

Downhill Harvey (OFMC) /

Put a shit load of nuts and bolts in it, and shake, shake, shake. Use a telescoping magnet to get them all out.

Re: gas tank rust

I did well with CLR followed by muriatic acid. I didn't use nuts and bolts and be VERY careful with both chemicals. I stained my driveway a bit.

The tank isn't sparkling by any means but it flows and what flows out is clean.

Make sure to wash it out well and rinse out with some kind of base - even just water with soap will work.

Once it's all done I sprayed the inside of the tank with WD40 and filled with pre-mix and let it sit while I worked on the rest of the bike. I also cleaned out all the filters on my tank and petcock and now everything that flows out seems to be clean as a whistle. I did add an inline filter, just in case and because I'm not using the petcock and built in filter anymore.

Re: gas tank rust

Bad Cadillac™ /

If vinegar did not work, you got bigger rust issues.

Re: gas tank rust

homedepot, metal rescue. works well

Re: gas tank rust

Johnny Leonardini /

If you have access to a car battery charger and old car battery, I've had excellent luck with electrolytic conversion and a pressure washer. The key is to oil down or seal your tank as soon as its done or it will flash rust.

Re: gas tank rust

timothy rendall /

I'm surprised you didn't have any luck with 'Vinegar' !

Did you leave it long enough?

Did you renew the Vinegar after a few days?

Did you give the tank a shake a few times a day?

When i did my triumph tank it had about 1" of rust /sludge in the bottom and after two weeks it came out like new.

I didn't think vinegar would work and i've used all the other stuff, I even went out and got some 75% prof Phosphoric acid !

But i was totally surprised how the vinegar worked !

I use the car battery method on small stuff that i can put in a bucket and the 'Acid' for the stuff like body work .

So i'd say give the vinegar an other go!

rust never sleeps

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Re: gas tank rust

elias kelly /

yeah renwew after 3 days nd the problem is I cant shake it the way puchs are made. ill try these ideas

Re: gas tank rust

I'm looking at cleaning my tank too, i've done all the research.

Is it recommended to do a tear down on your Puch before attempting a purging? Or can I leave my maxi all put together....

Re: gas tank rust

Downhill Harvey (OFMC) /

^^^ It's easier to take off as much off of it as possible, cuz, if you add an abrasive (nuts and bolts), it'll make it easier to shake, shake, shake, shake your booty.

Re: gas tank rust

vinegar works, you're just doing it wrong.

I used vinegar on a tank with handfuls of rust. I used a brush & some naval jelly up front, then the 8 hour soak, and it came out as shiny new metal.

Use a brush you can get down in there with.

Re: gas tank rust

timothy rendall /

I must admit that the tank frame combination make it not easy to de-rust a maxi tank. but if it is that rusty i would strip it down so as to give it a good shake. All i would do is take as much off in big lumps. Don't strip it down to the last nut & bolt, after all the engine is only held on with a few bolts ! give it a go and let us all know how you get on :)

Re: gas tank rust

Christian Bordelon /

I have a Vespa SI that the tank rusted, put in muratic acid, then rinsed out thoroughly after a day of sitting. Then used a 2 part epoxy and rolled the frame until it was all coated and let the rest drip out from the petcock hole. After the epoxy dried for a couple of days I drilled out the hardened epoxy from the petcock hole and havent had trouble since.

Re: gas tank rust

I filled mine last night with gravel and water and shook it like hell, emptied and drained and repeated about 4x till the water came out clear. I also had to chisel some crud off the bottom with a long screwdriver, then put some paper towels in it to sop up the remaining water then blew a hairdryer in it till it was visibly dry. I've done this with a few vintage outboard tanks and my other old moped tank.....seems to work well. Now I need to learn how to prevent this from happening in the future.

Re: gas tank rust

Christian Bordelon Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> I have a Vespa SI that the tank rusted, put in

> muratic acid, then rinsed out thoroughly after a

> day of sitting. Then used a 2 part epoxy and

> rolled the frame until it was all coated and let

> the rest drip out from the petcock hole. After the

> epoxy dried for a couple of days I drilled out the

> hardened epoxy from the petcock hole and havent

> had trouble since.

What brand epoxy did you use? Wondering because I've heard mixed reviews of this method. Do you avoid ethanol fuels?

Re: gas tank rust

Steve Vitale Wrote:

-------------------------------------------------------

> homedepot, metal rescue. works well

This^^

Re: gas tank rust

Double Trouble Dan /

Metal rescue , evapo-rust, and wd-40 300045 rust soak are made of EDTA.

Its $12/pound. Can be used as needed .All are Chelating compounds.

Tetrasodium EDTA Na4 Chelate

Tetrasodium ethylenediaminetetraacetate tetrahydrate

EDTA-Na4 Tetrahydrate

(C10H12N2Na4O8)

Specifically, the metal chelating agent has preferably a water solubility of 1 g or more, more preferably a water solubility of 10 g or more, per 100 g water, depending on the type of the chelating agent.

Examples of the water-soluble metal chelating agent used in the present invention include aminocarboxylic acid-based compounds such as ethylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA), diethylenetriaminepentaacetate (DTPA), triethylenetetraminehexaacetate (TTHA), glutamic diacetate (GLDA), hydroxyethylethylenediaminetriacetate (HEDTA), dihydroxyethylethylenediaminediacetate (DHEDDA), 1,3-propanediaminetetraacetate (1,3-PDTA), 1,3-diamino-2-hydroxypropanetetraacetate (DPTA-OH), nitrilotriacetate (NTA), hydroxyethyliminodiacetate (HIDA), dihydroxyethyl glycine (DHEG) etc.; phosphonic acid-based compounds such as phosphonobutane tricarboxylate (PBTC), nitrilotris(methylenephosphonate) (NTMP), hydroxy ethylidene diphosphonate (HEDP) etc.; and hydroxycarboxylic acid-based compounds such as citrate, malate, glycolate, lactate, gluconate etc. These salts include alkali metal salts, ammonium salts etc.

[0022] These compounds in the composition for rust removal in the form of an aqueous solution or in the solution for removing rust occur in a substantially salt form depending on the basic compound in the composition for rust removal. The salt form is advantageous in increasing solubility in water and in preparing a concentrated aqueous solution. Some of the basic compounds described above, such as tripolyphosphate, have a metal chelating action, and by incorporation thereof into the composition for rust removal, the action thereof can also be utilized.

[0023] The metal chelating agents can be used alone or as a mixture of two or more thereof. Among these compounds, aminocarboxylic acid-based compounds particularly have a high chelating ability, and are thus excellent in the use effect and particularly preferable.

[0024] In the composition for rust removal, the water-soluble metal chelating agent is preferably 0.01 to 10 parts by weight, more preferably 0.1 to 5 parts by weight, relative to 1 part by weight of thiourea dioxide. Given the metal chelating agent within the range described above, the rust-removing effect can further be improved. The amount of the basic compound used is not particularly limited insofar as the pH of the solution containing the composition for rust removal at the time of rust-removing treatment is in the alkaline range (pH 7 or more, preferably 8 or more, more preferably 9.5 or more). However, when the amount of the basic compound used is too high, disposal of waste liquor after the rust-removing treatment is difficult, and thus the amount of the basic compound used, though being varied depending on the type of the compound, is preferably reduced in the maximum degree within such a range as to achieve the desired rust-removing effect.

Re: gas tank rust

"Results of my 8 hour apple cider vinegar soak of my 1980 Vespa P200E fuel tank"

Re: gas tank rust

Christian Bordelon /

Not 100% sure of the brand. It's an offshore epoxy primer. My dad is a crane mechanic and he has gallons of the shit lying around. And yes I avoid ethanol fuel as much as possible. I've only put ethanol gas once in 1 of my bikes as a last resort just so I could get to work. The SI was sitting for years. I had it when I was about 12 and it died. Back in the mid 90's there wasnt the internet to tell us how to fix the problem so the bike sat. Until about 2 years ago and then we got it running. When I go back to visit my parents I'll see if any of the cans have a label. This stuff worked great for us.

Re: gas tank rust

I am in process of cleaning my tank. Evaporust worked well, but I wanted to be sure it was clean, as I had pulled some chunks out of the tank, so I put a bunch of nuts in there and shook. Whatever was left got cleaned out pretty well, but the shaking must have hit a thin part of a wall or seam because I developed a leak above the front sprocket area (I'm guessing) that cannot be seen due to factory welding. I was going to use POR 15, but it seems to be a little bigger than a pinhole, so I ordered Caswell Epoxy Tank Sealer on Friday. It's much thicker than the POR 15, so I'm hoping that will do the trick. I've heard good things about it on some cycle forums and Youtube, etc., so I am hopeful it will work. I'm glad I used the nuts because it exposed that weak spot. Since it's stripped down it will be easy to turn it every which way to make sure it all gets coated.

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