Rim Replacement

Herbie Haster /

Does anyone here have any tips or tricks on replacing a rim? I have a rear wheel from a Mobylette, with a bent beyone repiar rim, but the hub is good. Now I have a rim which happens to be the same size and dimensions and number of spokes, the only diff is it does not have the little dimples on the sides of the rim. Has anyone re-spoked thier wheels, and if so, how did they do it? I made a jig from wood already, where I can spin the wheel, and see if it is circular, as well as if it is running up and down (side to side if installed). Now, I was able to make it run true and circular, but I don't know the spoke tension)

Re: Rim Replacement

See Ya Moped Army /

Personally, I would just get a used rear Moby rim. I probably have one here somewhere.

MoPedLar

Re: Rim Replacement

Herbie Haster /

I am using a used rim. I think you mean the entire assembly.

Re: Rim Replacement

You are on the right track, that is if you really want to build a wheel. MoPedLar is right though, getting a good used wheel is easier.

I have built bicycle wheels before and two things can happen when building a wheel. It can go together easaly and be no problem, or it can go together just slightly off. When it goes together slightly off only an experianced wheel builder can correct it. There is some art to building a wheel, and if you do not know that art, or have the feel for building a wheel no amount of fiddleing with it will get it right.

So, you are better off getting a good used wheel. But, while you are looking for that wheel try the rebuild. You could get it right. If not you will learn how dificult it can be to get the wheel just right.

Re: Rim Replacement

Herbie Haster /

Sure, it's the eaier way, but I don't know if you would necessarily be "better off".

Re: Rim Replacement

Gregory Mcintire /

The key to getting the rim true when relacing it is to make very minor adjustments on the spokes as you go. By minor I mean 1/4 turn of the spoke nipple at a time.

The best way to judge the tension is to tap the spokes with a screwdriver or whatever, and listen to the ring. Compare this ring with that of your other wheel or any known good wheel. It should "ring", not "thud" but not too terribly high of a pitch, just a happy ring.

You will almost certainly not have the spokes all sound identical in pitch. That is okay. That is not as important as having the wheel true.

As others have said, it is "easier" to buy a ready laced wheel. I have found that I don't get a great deal of satisfaction buying things. I would rather repair or rebuild any day.

Re: Rim Replacement

Gregory Mcintire /

If I understand your post correctly I think you said you already have it laced up but have not quite finished tightened the spokes. If so, disregard the following. Otherwise, I should have mentioned the procdure I always use is to first lay the new rim on a flat surface to see that it is flat, and bend it as required to make it as flat as you can (within reason). Next measure its diameter at several places to see that is in round and not oval, again bending as required to reach a degree that you will be satisfied with. Next screw on all the spoke nipples the same amount as accurately as you can judge, going around and round the wheel little at a time. Then proceed with the incremental tightening till they ring, watching the lateral and radial runout as you go.

If you have difficulty getting if trued up to an acceptable level, you can always unscrew all the nipples and start over, being more careful. Just don't be quick to give up. There is nothing that a professional can do that you can't do.

Re: Rim Replacement

Herbie Haster /

Thanks Greg. I do have it trued up, and I actually did what you just mentioned about getting the rim as streaight as possible first. and turning each nipple an equal ammount. I just need to tighten till they ring now, and recheck.

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