Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

Downhill Harvey (OFMC) /

Pics of a cylinder head on your butt, or it didn't happen.

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

something high end like a trek

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

I don't know.... I'd say get something like a quality MTB or a cruiser that doesn't come from Wal Mart. Obviously the frame will have to not break, but I think your primary concern will be wheel bearings. Sealed bearings are great, but serviceable bearings should give you longer service on the road. Keep in mind that bicycles aren't designed to go at super high speeds (except road bikes that won't be suitable for your purposes). You'll be putting some serious stress on the wheel bearings. You may want to go with disk brakes, but if you use rim brakes, make sure you get those salmon-colored pads.

The thing is, I'm wondering if you might be happier putting together a touring/randonneur bike and going that way. With the right gearing and a bit of training, you won't ever need to use that engine, and you'll save a lot of weight. A google search yielded rusa.org; also check out the touring section of bikeforums.net.

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

Edward Richardson /

I've done long distances on motorized bicycles using the inexpensive engines unlike most of the advice givers here. I won't tell you that they are junk because they aren't, any drooling moron can blow up a motor. They are designed to operate at 20 mph with occasional blasts up to 25 mph using the 40 tooth sprocket. Used within this range they seem to last for years, I have two that are four years old in regular use. I had three others that I used to evaluate the design in high speed and endurance runs on a Schwinn Stingray II. Regular checks of the exhaust, motor mount, and carburetor nuts at every stop are mandatory as the vibrations at 30 mph and up are highly destructive. At 40 mph the vibrations made the bicycle unsafe to operate as the eyeballs vibrate in the socket to such a degree as to blur the vision and you can only look at the front tire. Engine #1 Hard seized- Due to factory red carb seal disolving in synthetic 2-stroke. Engine #2 Catastrophic failure- Motor mount bolts at the rear and front fell out or loosened causing the case to crack during 40 mile high speed run. Engine #3 Upper connecting rod bushing failure- Wear caused excessive clatter and engine performance decline.

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

^^^Listen to Bangers.

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

Edward Richardson /

Using proper break in procedures, engineer out the plastic chain tensioner, checking your fasteners at every stop, and regulating your speed to 20 mph. a cross country trip is not out of the question. However due to the lack of suspension and the engine vibration your body suffers a great deal. The "gator bite" in your hands, wrists, and arms can be severe, think carpal tunnel with bee stings. The hammering on the spine makes for an interesting night.

The moped ride is much more Cadillac like and is overengineered to take the abuse of higher speeds. I would really recommend one for an enjoyable trip versus a test of willpower and endurance.

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

so this isn't targaped?

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

what about having a bike with front suspension and a cushy seat? wouldn't that reduce some of the "gator bite"?

Re: Traveling cross-country via moped

yeah you would want front suspension

the spindle drive units dont vibrate like the frame mounted engines do

http://www.motorizedfoldupbikes.com/

http://www.bikemotor.com/Honda%20AdvantEDGE.html

the honda ones are the best ones to buy

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