Highway laws

I know this is going to vary by state but overall what is the law for mopeds on non-limited access highways? (ie: US and state highways that don't use exits like interstates)

From what I can find from my home state of Arkansas, it only states that it's unlawful to ride upon any public road or highway without a permit/license (except for limited access highways which are always forbidden).

It seems that Texas is the same. the reason I care about the law for TX is I'm sitting about 2 miles from TX and will often be riding into TX.

What I am wondering about if it's legal to ride on such highways, are you allowed to (or even restricted to) the shoulder? What about a non-limited access highway that states no driving on shoulder? I suppose that sign wouldn't apply to bicycles & mopeds since they aren't able to go 55mph.

By Arkansas law, mopeds (50cc and under) are "motorized bicycles" and need to registration or insurance. So as I'm understanding it, it would be legal for me to ride it along a US or state highway (that doesn't have exits), probably on the shoulder since it's so slow and is pretty much considered a bicycle...just a motorized one.

There is a good reason I am asking this. I would like to travel around nearby within AR and nearby states to camp without having to take my car. Lots of scenic state highways with low speed limits in Arkansas but to get to them you must travel busier US highways to cross rivers to get to the state highways. Or the US highway may just be perfectly direct to where I may be heading.

Anyone know anything any different?

Re: Highway laws

In Kansas, some highways have signs specifically restricting them to faster-moving traffic. I take K10 a lot, and at every entrance there's a sign that says that pedestrians, bicycles, motorized bicycles, horse-drawn vehicles, and other slow-moving traffic is prohibited.

I don't know about the main interstates, though. Even if you could ride on them, would you really want to? That'd be pretty much suicidal. You really ought to look into mapping programs or even spend some time attempting to figure out back-road routes on Google Earth. The back roads are prettier anyway, and there's less traffic and somewhat lower speeds.

Re: Highway laws

Here in GA the only place you can't ride is an interstate. Back roads can be really dangerous too, just because the posted speed limit is lower doesn't mean some asshole not ready to look out for a moped isn't going to come flying around a corner in your lane.

Re: Highway laws

Quote: "...and at every entrance there’s a sign that says that pedestrians, bicycles, motorized bicycles, horse-drawn vehicles, and other slow-moving traffic is prohibited"

That would be a "limited access" highway then due to the sign. Out in CA they post signs like that on the on-ramps to interstates and freeways (freeways = highways with exits/on-ramps). I have no desire to ride along interstates. I thought I made that clear by saying US and state highways and back roads.

Re: Highway laws

Quote: "Here in GA the only place you can’t ride is an interstate. Back roads can be really dangerous too, just because the posted speed limit is lower doesn’t mean some asshole not ready to look out for a moped isn’t going to come flying around a corner in your lane."

I have a feeling thats how it is in almost every state. And I agree, back roads can be dangerous too. Thats why you wear a helmet and use common sense when riding any sort of cycle. But I would imagine it's safer to on a less traveled state highway than a major, busy US highway if you can avoid it.

Re: Highway laws

i ride on highways all the time, i never even thought to check if it was legal or not.

Re: Highway laws

In Indiana, Mopeds are treated as bicycles. Except on bike trails, where motors of any kind are prohibited. So any road you could ride your bike on, mopeds are okay. Interstates are illegal in every state i'm pretty sure, and who would want to anyway?

Google maps has a option now that shows how to get from Point A to Point B without taking any highways. I've used that for journeys into unknown territory and it works pretty well.

Re: Highway laws

The wiki here doesn't have entries for OK or TX. From moped2.org, it appears that you can ride every road except "high speed highways" or of course interstates, in OK. If the road has mailboxes, driveways, and side roads connecting right to the road it is probably not a high speed highway.

In TX you are equivalent to a bicycle so bike lanes should be allowed. In TX you must stay as far right as practical, but still in the travel lane. Other states give a moped the right to the whole lane, but it is probably still safest to stay as far right as practical. That does invite cars to pass you with (hopefully) inches to spare but also when someone isn't paying attention and comes flying up behind you, it will be easier for them to miss you.

Riding on the shoulder probably won't get you a ticket unless it's actually a sidewalk, not a shoulder, or you're doing it to get an advantage in passing traffic.

Re: Highway laws

Yes, I often check the box for avoid highways just to see how a route would go. My Navigon 2100 GPS also allows you to "Avoid" or even "Forbid" highways (meaning interstates). Also you can set it to bicycle or walking speed instead of auto. When driving around in Little Rock back in January, I was trying to find a place I hadn't been before and i set it to avoid highways. It ended up taking me down narrow country roads just about but it did get me there although it's targeting for the address was off by about 3/4 of a mile.

Ah yes, and when I was trying to find a nearby Applebees it had programmed into it already under a POI, it took me to a dead end road with a casket company and nothing else around. I then set it to take me back to a Wal-Mart I had seen and it turns out THAT is where the Applebees was. Gotta love faulty GPS directions.

This past week when I went and bought my 84 Spree, I had the GPS on to help me get to the destination. But I took an exit to a US highway to avoid a bad freeway in Dallas I was told about. The GPS gets mighty bossy when you stay off course too long. It will say, in a somewhat polite voice "Please make a u-turn NOW". At first it says "if possible" but then it just DEMANDS it. After about 10 miles on the other route it finally gave in and told me to continue on the road I was on, lol

Re: Highway laws

Quote:

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The wiki here doesn’t have entries for OK or TX. From moped2.org, it appears that you can ride every road except "high speed highways" or of course interstates, in OK. If the road has mailboxes, driveways, and side roads connecting right to the road it is probably not a high speed highway.

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Thats a pretty vague term for Texas. In TX, some narrow, 2 lane state and US highways with really no shoulder to speak of are 70MPH. I know, I've driven some. Makes no sense at all..

Along a US highway leading out of TX and into OK, I think the OK speed limit on the same highway went down to 60-65 and down as low as 45-50 on some of the hard curves they put in between the surrounding farm land.

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