hillbilly rig! petcock!

toe fur threadkiller /

at least until i get to kzoo.

soooo....traveler has spark, compression, clear fuel passage, blah blah blah....except that the fuckin' petcock is either blocked or not opening.

hillbilly rig.

if anyone has a free petcock, let me know. i mean, my birthday's only in like five months.

if not, i'll buy one.

damn.

hillbilly rig! petcock!

Steamboat Aka J. R. Stevens /

What you need is a Hoosier -rig petcock. Jim

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

u could just grab a connector this would kill your reserve but it would run

and lemme see i might have an extra

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

toe fur threadkiller /

fuck that hoosier noise.....hahaha. i was born in ohio, and i come from WVA coal-miner hillbilly stock.

i just live in indiana.

heh.

hoosiers can't rig stuff nearly as well as hillbillies can.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

What exactly IS a "hoosier?" I know what a hillbilly is, and I've also heard of the enigmatic Mountain Williams.

I saw what I think to be one sasquatch, and at least 4 UFO's too.

I saw a house fly, and even a horse fly, but I ain't never seen a elephant fly. I heard a rubber band,and I seen a peanut stand.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

toe fur threadkiller /

dude. deezy. definitely saw a bigfoot about a mile and a half from my house the other night. ridiculous. not a doubt in my mind.

heh. dumbo.

marvelous movie, what with it's clearly-drawn-by-white-guys-in-the-fifties racially suggestive crows.

fuckin' petcock.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

May have been white sketch artists, but those were some great black voices them crows had. I love'em! I haven't seen it in many years.

so a hoosier is a "fookin petcock?"

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

I ran my Puch for a while with a piece of rubber hose that fit tight over the tank threads, and the fuel line stuck tight in the other end of that. Almost anything can be rigged, and who needs reserve. Carry extra fuel. Peace. Jerry.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

Oh and as a kid, I had these tiny floppy records that came with a tiny portable record player I got for my birthday. There musta been 8 singles or so that were on those tiny 3 or 4 inch records. They were all done by the same guys that sung for those crows. Good stuff!

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

yes i do but it goes to a passport and only has 2 connectors. res and on last one connects directly to the carb but if u turn it to off it goes through so this would work unless u need a res. u can have it if u come and get it,pay the 1.00 shipping or if i am dropping by there its yours i would still suggest a connector and a bolt for an on off switch

lastly i can't say it is in perfect condition. cuz the whole carb was dumped into carb cleaner for a few days and that ate some holes in my carb. doesn't leak though

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

dude, get a fucking drill, and drill it out. Any redneck would have figured that out days ago.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

Or coon's ass.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

get a brass or nylon nipple and thread it in there, fuel line on the nipple, and if you want put a filter on the line and an inline valve.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

As a distant relative to the Hatfields I say go to your local True Value and pick up a brass nipple....

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

***Kim Jong Uno*** /

hoosiers rig better than an anyone. and the definition of a hoosier is widely debated.

A contractor reportedly named Samuel Hoosier preferred to hire workers from Indiana during the construction of the Louisville and Portland Canal (1826-1831) in Louisville. His employees became known as "Hoosier's men" and finally just "Hoosiers."

This idea suggests the term was a greeting. When approaching a man's home in those early frontier days, you shouted from afar, "Hello, the cabin!" to avoid being shot. The inhabitants would then shout back "Who'sh 'ere?" (who's there). As it got slurred together over time, the country folk came to be called Hoosiers.

A variant of this story combines "Who's" and "your", such as in "Who'sh yer 'pa?". Additionally, the poet James Whitcomb Riley facetiously suggested that the fierce brawling that took place in Indiana involved enough ear biting that the expression "Whose ear?" was common enough to be notable.

[edit]

Indiana rivermen were so spectacularly successful in trouncing or "hushing" their adversaries in the brawling that was then common that they became known as "hushers.

1hoosier [perhaps an alteration of Cumberland dialect, hoozer, anything large of its kind]

1: an awkward, unhandy, or unskilled person; especially: an ignorant rustic.

2: hoosier [usually capitalized]: Indianan--used as a nickname.

3hoosier (verb) slang: to loaf on or botch a job.

Webster's Third International Dictionary, 1976

hoosier A hillbilly or rustic; an unmannerly or objectionable person.

Dictionary of American Regional English, 1991

Dictionary of American Regional English, 1991

Before its use in America, hoosier was used in England to refer to someone who lived in the hills or mountains. It may be related to the French osier, meaning someone from the countryside, an uncultivated person. This term is still commonly used in Eastern Canada.

In colonial America, the terms cracker and hoosier were widely used to refer to white farmers who did not own slaves or large plantations. Because the best agricultural land, the flat land near the rivers and seacoast, was generally used for growing cash crops in large plantations,

small farms--usually in the hills and mountains--were identified with subsistence farming, and these farmers were poor and usually uneducated. Therefore, these terms had a derogatory connotation. Linguistic maps of the southern states indicate that cracker was used more often in the coastal areas of Virginia and North Carolina and in South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida. Hoosier was predominant in the mountains of Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina.

The southern half of Indiana, along the Ohio River, was settled first, along with Kentucky and Tennessee, and the earliest settlers came largely from the Appalachian region--Virginia, West Virginia, and North Carolina. By the early 1800s hoosier was widely used in Indiana to refer to poor farmers or ignorant, rustic people in general. The first newspaper usage of hoosier to refer to people from Indiana in general was in 1832. As sometimes happens, a nickname that originally had a negative connotation was adopted and used with pride by the bearers of the name. By the time of the American Civil War (1861-1865), this

nickname was firmly established. During the war, men from all parts of the United States came into close contact and relied on these nicknames to identify each other. Some examples: Indiana = Hoosiers, Maine = Foxes, Delaware = Muskrats, Ohio = Buckeyes, Wisconsin = Badgers, Iowa = Hawkeyes, New York = Knickerbockers.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

KY rig......

Fuel line + clamp, DONE.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

toe fur threadkiller /

or i could just swear alot about the fact that my entire drill bit set is missing, all the stores were closed[because sidewalks roll up early round these parts], and i just said fuckit.

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

yeah i got one do u want it ?

Re: hillbilly rig! petcock!

toe fur threadkiller /

nah dude. no rush now. i'll get a moby one and whack it one when i get back home.

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