Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

If you did your calculations right it should be feasible to print a rough fresnel.... the individual rings of the lens would need to be matched to the nozzle on the printer....

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

Terbo Speghetti /

> Thomas TPRF Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> If you did your calculations right it should be feasible to print a

> rough fresnel.... the individual rings of the lens would need to be

> matched to the nozzle on the printer....

Yeah, probably. But my question is why would you? A parabolic reflector accomplishes the same thing with a lot less work and engineering.

Fresnel lenses are great for lighthouses and stuff, but not practical on such a small scale imho

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

Dirty30 Dillon /

> Terbo Speghetti Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > Thomas TPRF Wrote:

>

> > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> > If you did your calculations right it should be feasible to print a

>

> > rough fresnel.... the individual rings of the lens would need to be

>

> > matched to the nozzle on the printer....

>

> Yeah, probably. But my question is why would you? A parabolic reflector

> accomplishes the same thing with a lot less work and engineering.

>

> Fresnel lenses are great for lighthouses and stuff, but not practical on

> such a small scale

Every efficient modern tungsten/HMI light has both a parabolic reflector and a fresnel lens, even down to 2" elements. The two definitely work great in conjunction.

But I won't argue that designing a purpose built fresnel is hard. There's big dollars in good fixture design.

I have a pile of old, stripped Mole-Richardson and Arri Fresnels at work, and I've always wanted to convert one to 12VDC to run as a head light just for shits and giggles.

One with wide beam and one focused to narrow beam.

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

♣Slew Foot♣ /

Lenticular are different how?

That's a buety now run a van de Graff off the variator...

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

Terbo Speghetti /

> Dirty30 Dillon Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > Terbo Speghetti Wrote:

>

> > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> > > Thomas TPRF Wrote:

>

> >

>

> > > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> >

>

> > > If you did your calculations right it should be feasible to print a

>

> >

>

> > > rough fresnel.... the individual rings of the lens would need to

> be

>

> >

>

> > > matched to the nozzle on the printer....

>

> >

>

> > Yeah, probably. But my question is why would you? A parabolic

> reflector

>

> > accomplishes the same thing with a lot less work and engineering.

>

> >

>

> > Fresnel lenses are great for lighthouses and stuff, but not practical

> on

>

> > such a small scale

>

> Every efficient modern tungsten/HMI light has both a parabolic reflector

> and a fresnel lens, even down to 2" elements. The two definitely work

> great in conjunction.

>

> But I won't argue that designing a purpose built fresnel is hard.

> There's big dollars in good fixture design.

>

> I have a pile of old, stripped Mole-Richardson and Arri Fresnels at

> work, and I've always wanted to convert one to 12VDC to run as a head

> light just for shits and giggles.

>

> One with wide beam and one focused to narrow beam.

You did see that I made a tail light and not a headlight, right?

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

♣Slew Foot♣ /

Yep.

3d printer ? Could you add a z axis cradle and do light machining passes?

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

Terbo Speghetti /

> ♣Slew Foot♣ Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Yep.

>

> 3d printer ? Could you add a z axis cradle and do light machining

> passes?

You*could* do anything. But no.

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

Dirty30 Dillon /

> Terbo Speghetti Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > Dirty30 Dillon Wrote:

>

> > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> > > Terbo Speghetti Wrote:

>

> >

>

> > > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> >

>

> > > > Thomas TPRF Wrote:

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > > If you did your calculations right it should be feasible to print

> a

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > > rough fresnel.... the individual rings of the lens would need to

>

> > be

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > > matched to the nozzle on the printer....

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Yeah, probably. But my question is why would you? A parabolic

>

> > reflector

>

> >

>

> > > accomplishes the same thing with a lot less work and engineering.

>

> >

>

> > >

>

> >

>

> > > Fresnel lenses are great for lighthouses and stuff, but not

> practical

>

> > on

>

> >

>

> > > such a small scale

>

> >

>

> > Every efficient modern tungsten/HMI light has both a parabolic

> reflector

>

> > and a fresnel lens, even down to 2" elements. The two definitely work

>

> > great in conjunction.

>

> >

>

> > But I won't argue that designing a purpose built fresnel is hard.

>

> > There's big dollars in good fixture design.

>

> >

>

> > I have a pile of old, stripped Mole-Richardson and Arri Fresnels at

>

> > work, and I've always wanted to convert one to 12VDC to run as a head

>

> > light just for shits and giggles.

>

> >

>

> > One with wide beam and one focused to narrow beam.

>

> You did see that I made a tail light and not a headlight, right?

Yes.

Lenticular or fresnel style moldings would just boost output, is all I am aiming to convey. I don't think it will make or break the functionality of the design, either way.

Re: Would you run a 3d printed light lens?

♣Slew Foot♣ /

Tractor lights work awesome but the angle is too wide if you raised the tractor style pylons and steepend the angle to 120 instead of the 170...

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