Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

outatime andy /

I've been reading a lot about the Trans America Trail, an offroad trail that spans from coast to coast made up of dirt and gravel roads. These guys did it on Honda Groms.

The 2018 Grom has 9.8 bhp, not much more than some mopeds. The Grom has 12in wheels, the 17in wheels on my Puch could handle offroad terrain much better. Especially with a pair of these

To the point, I love moped rides and adventure. Would anybody else consider riding a portion of the trail, only a couple states? Either as an organized rally or just a group?

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

That sounds and looks like fun right there.

That's 6524 miles one way.....

Hmm. I need to figure out a way to do this. (edited)

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Do it on a TRUE moped,forget the GROM. Take a look at Walter Muma's 1979 trip. That's a REAL moped man going for an ADVENTURE.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

outatime andy /

I'm talking about doing it on a Puch

But his trip does sound like quite the adventure. I want to do the Trans America Trail because I wouldn't have to worry about cars whizzing past me, and could still see some beautiful sights and towns. (edited)

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

> outatime andy Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> I'm talking about doing it on a Puch

>

> But his trip does sound like quite the adventure. I want to do the Trans

> America Trail because I wouldn't have to worry about cars whizzing past

> me, and could still see some beautiful sights and towns.

Yes,it would be a good test for a Puch, OR a Motobecane Sebring! (;^)

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

No wizzing cars true but bears, mountain lions, bob cats (and hopefully a cougar or two) along the way could warrant pulling out my pistoli.

Should be done on a modified, reliable ped that has readily available parts and room for gear. A big ass tank would help too. Something with two tanks like a safari.

Would be cool to build up and modify a vintage ped just for trips like this. (edited)

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

The best moped for this is a supercharged CaFe RaCeR!

Vroom vroom!

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

I would hope the 100,000 rpm whizzing noise of the electric supercharger would be enough to scare off the wildlife.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Dirty30 Dillon /

> outatime andy Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > The 2018 Grom has 9.8 bhp, not much more than some mopeds.

Wut... I think that if you actually dyno'ed the majority of the kitted and carbed bikes in the community are around 7-ish.

Also, a liquid-cooled, geared grom is much more suited to trail riding than a single speed, air-cooled moped. That said, a bunch of dudes have done it, albeit on not traditional mopeds

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

https://getblatzed.tumblr.com/

sweet! let us know how it goes!

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

I followed along when the TAT group did it a few years ago, it was really fun to keep up with. I think they were having daily maintenance issues but still, rad. write it up so we can follow along!

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Lots if guys do it on their KLR650s

But It would be a Lot more Enjoyable on a late70's/80's 125-250 Enduro or even a KLR250 (Somethin Dead Reliable & Light)

I wouldn't attempt it on a Moped without a Spare Cylinder/Piston/Carb/etc

+ another Complete Motor That's Ready To Drop In On The Spot. That way you have a Fightin Chance of Minimal BreakDowns & with Networking you'll be able to Rebuild the Spare Motor in Everpy State (with minimal time.)

Also the Kit you need to carry changes dramatically too - it ain't no camping trip.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Yeah when the did it in 2014 it was pretty cool. They had the treat sponsered bus for chase. Raised a little money with some cool shirts, abandoned on bike on the trail, and built some cool mopeds for it.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Jimmy Cincinnati /

Also, a liquid-cooled, geared grom is much more suited to trail riding than a single speed, air-cooled moped. That said, a bunch of dudes have done it, albeit on not traditional mopeds

The trail is just not a good fit for mopeds. Breaking down in the middle of nowhere sounds terrible and being only a 1 or 2 speed the hills would suck. Groms atleast have gearing and more power to pull you through (granted the smaller wheels would suck off road).

But It would be a Lot more Enjoyable on a late70's/80's 125-250 Enduro or even a KLR250 (Somethin Dead Reliable & Light)

Agreed. Dont do it to be cool, just do it to have fun. Pick a bike more up to the task. You dont need to go KLR650 but a Honda XR250 or Suzuki DR200 might be fun. Wonder how a Yamaha TW200 would do on the trail?

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Well, there ARE some trails I wouldn't try, being over 230 lbs. and taking 30 lbs. of extras along.

Man's/woman's gotta know his/her bike's limitations

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

When I was a kid in my early in teens, I had a 1976 Suzuki TS 125 Enduro. It would top out around 65-70, and went forever on a tank of gas. It climbed hills like a beast. My brother had a Kawasaki 175, iirc, enduro that had hi/Lo range on the transmission. Either bike would be a perfect bike for that trip. But a moped? Probably not.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

A number of people have ridden across America and Canada via moped.

Three Germans visited USA a couple of years ago and rode New York City to New Orleans on their WAY OF ELLA charity ride (40km/h versions of their bikes) which a lot of moped folks on the route I am sure remember meeting those great guys.

https://way-of-ella.com/

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Some moped dudes did some of it, I've also seen a post about doing it on vintage two stroke enduros. The eastern half of the TAT seems pretty doable but the west seems to present a lot more difficulty - plus with two strokes elevation might become more of an issue. I am under the impression that any reasonable DS bike, like an xt250 or tw200 etc can make it.

I'd def be into trying on something like dt50 or pitbike (magx TAT!) - the small size means you can just push it up and over stuff you wouldn't otherwise be able to manage.

2020 year of the dorkar moped (edited)

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

It also occurs to me that one of the big challenges of small bores would be weight/ carrying capacity- adding another 70lb or so of fuel, tools, parts, food, water and gear might not shake a klr 650 so much but will heavily bog down a moped with no gearing and little torque. Either dividing gear up among a larger group (either other small bores or a few patient friends with torquier bikes) or having a chase vehicle take the majority of the heavy load would make it much more manageable

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Jimmy Cincinnati /

I'd def be into trying on something like dt50 or pitbike (magx TAT!)

Dang i even have a mag x but no time to do this!

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

I live at the other end of the trail than the original poster. Maybe id consider a ride from the east coast. Im pretty sure the grom riders had to stop their bikes to walk them up a few mountains. Also on top of all the animals that might be encountered you also have to watch out for bees. Allegedly the attack unprovoked and there are signs up in the area warning about it.

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Blk Shawn or Willie would be able to speak to this w/ much more insight than I could (having been the brain trust behind the 2014 run), but I would say the three biggest things would be logistics, embracing the few strengths mopeds do have over motos, and managing your expectations.

1) As far as logistics go, seems like having a chase was pretty invaluable to the 2014 run. Not only could they haul bikes and riders onto the breakdown bus, but the road crew could keep a much more substantial supply of parts, tools, and camping gear than 5 dudes on mopeds ever could. Not to mention following the paved roads adjacent to the TAT they could swoop whatever treats orders they could get shipped out to the sticks without the riders having to leave the trail and come back to it. Aside from that, they standardized, with several riders on some variation of flat reed. Derbi FR was a good choice from both a reliability and performance perspective, but I think the biggest part was they were all comfortable working with one, so I don't think an E50 would be the worst choice in the world. You would probably wanna carry multiple sprockets to change gearing as you went and the clutch would most likely need to be full-on replaced at least once.

2) Obviously I'm not saying mopeds are gonna be easier than motos on the TAT, but they do have a couple advantages that you would have to really lean into to make it work. First, they are gonna be way lighter than any moto a sane person would bring on the trails. Downed tree in the track? Duders on KLR 650's are either gonna break out the handsaws or turn back, where you and a bud could pretty easily just haul that bad boy over it. Water crossing too deep? Same deal, or you could wait till your pipe cools down and float it across on a truck inner tube. Second, even though mopeds are objectively less reliable than motos, they make up for it in simplicity. I remember Shawn posting on an ADV Riders' forum, and all the members debbie downering him because they had to lube their chains or whatever on the ride. I'm pretty sure they did at least two full bottom end rebuilds in the tall weeds and welded multiple frames back together in gas station bathrooms before they even cleared the midwest.

3) Seems kinda like no matter how much money you raise or how much time you give yourself, moped TAT is kinda tempting fate. You're gonna make less miles most days than your most conservative estimates, some failure on your bike you'd never even think about will occur (twice probably), and you're gonna eat shit somewhere along the route. The 2014 crew ended up skipping most of Oklahoma in chase because of a time crunch to make it to Denver for the rally, even though I don't think they were planning to do much more than 100 miles a day for two weeks. Knowing that shit happens and mentally preparing yourself is probably just as important as any other preparations you can make for your bikes or camping.

Hopefully all this doesn't dissuade you however. As you can tell by this long ass post (sorry lol) I've thought about this a lot, and it seems to me to embody everything great about mopeds. Pushing 50 y/o machines beyond the limits of what the original engineers could have dreamed of, mastering your bike both mechanically and technically, and above all chilling w/ ur best buds and figuring stuff out as y'all go...

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

> iskra chornia Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> Blk Shawn or Willie would be able to speak to this w/ much more insight

> than I could (having been the brain trust behind the 2014 run), but I

> would say the three biggest things would be logistics, embracing the few

> strengths mopeds do have over motos, and managing your expectations.

>

> 1) As far as logistics go, seems like having a chase was pretty

> invaluable to the 2014 run. Not only could they haul bikes and riders

> onto the breakdown bus, but the road crew could keep a much more

> substantial supply of parts, tools, and camping gear than 5 dudes on

> mopeds ever could. Not to mention following the paved roads adjacent to

> the TAT they could swoop whatever treats orders they could get shipped

> out to the sticks without the riders having to leave the trail and come

> back to it. Aside from that, they standardized, with several riders on

> some variation of flat reed. Derbi FR was a good choice from both a

> reliability and performance perspective, but I think the biggest part

> was they were all comfortable working with one, so I don't think an E50

> would be the worst choice in the world. You would probably wanna carry

> multiple sprockets to change gearing as you went and the clutch would

> most likely need to be full-on replaced at least once.

>

> 2) Obviously I'm not saying mopeds are gonna be easier than motos on the

> TAT, but they do have a couple advantages that you would have to really

> lean into to make it work. First, they are gonna be way lighter than any

> moto a sane person would bring on the trails. Downed tree in the track?

> Duders on KLR 650's are either gonna break out the handsaws or turn

> back, where you and a bud could pretty easily just haul that bad boy

> over it. Water crossing too deep? Same deal, or you could wait till your

> pipe cools down and float it across on a truck inner tube. Second, even

> though mopeds are objectively less reliable than motos, they make up for

> it in simplicity. I remember Shawn posting on an ADV Riders' forum, and

> all the members debbie downering him because they had to lube their

> chains or whatever on the ride. I'm pretty sure they did at least two

> full bottom end rebuilds in the tall weeds and welded multiple frames

> back together in gas station bathrooms before they even cleared the

> midwest.

>

> 3) Seems kinda like no matter how much money you raise or how much time

> you give yourself, moped TAT is kinda tempting fate. You're gonna make

> less miles most days than your most conservative estimates, some failure

> on your bike you'd never even think about will occur (twice probably),

> and you're gonna eat shit somewhere along the route. The 2014 crew

> ended up skipping most of Oklahoma in chase because of a time crunch to

> make it to Denver for the rally, even though I don't think they were

> planning to do much more than 100 miles a day for two weeks. Knowing

> that shit happens and mentally preparing yourself is probably just as

> important as any other preparations you can make for your bikes or

> camping.

>

> Hopefully all this doesn't dissuade you however. As you can tell by

> this long ass post (sorry lol) I've thought about this a lot, and it

> seems to me to embody everything great about mopeds. Pushing 50 y/o

> machines beyond the limits of what the original engineers could have

> dreamed of, mastering your bike both mechanically and technically, and

> above all chilling w/ ur best buds and figuring stuff out as y'all go...

Really the best post yet ^^

Re: Moped Adventure on the Trans America Trail (Not the Entire Trail)

Did it. Seized/blew up 8 times before Arkansas. Went home.

http://nolamopeds.blogspot.com/2014/05/tat-moped-finished-here-is-finished.html?m=1

Good luck!

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