Considerations with buying old moped

What are your considerations when buying an older moped? What do you value these things at? What are deal killers for you?

I'm thinking of...

- Idles?

- Compression?

- Spark?

- Gas tank rust?

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

If you want something bad enough , there are no deal killers . That is , unless you can't afford that something .

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

if its seized, I woldn't pay more than $50 for it lol

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Pushrod Fifty /

The biggest thing is what other people have done to them which can raise the price of making them roadworthy exponentially.

The best is a bike that is runningthst you can use now.

Look for signs of bad wrenching, rounded out nuts and bolts, hardware store fasteners on it, bent parts, cracked engine cases, poorly done mods, etc.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

kd ohio - I hear ya on that... If you're planning to put new top end kit on it regardless, does that really impact it much though? Also might be a really nice parts bike to consider purchasing if you're able to talk it down because it's siezed (edited)

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Thanks supercub, this is definitely the type of conversation I was looking to elicit... Good points! (edited)

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

If it's cheap, has parts I want, and I can fix it, I'll buy it.

If it's over-priced, has someone else's idea of "custom," and is spray painted flat black with a bondo'd on top tank, I'll just laugh at it for the year or so it sits on Craigslist.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Supercub hit most points, I look for unmolested survivor bikes, complete, stored indoors is HUGE for me. Missing gas cap is a bad deal....depending on where you are having paperwork can be a big deal when determining price. Running is ideal, but will buy one non running if it has been stored properly.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

> baird co Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> If it's cheap, has parts I want, and I can fix it, I'll buy it.

>

> If it's over-priced, has someone else's idea of "custom," and is spray

> painted flat black with a bondo'd on top tank, I'll just laugh at it for

> the year or so it sits on Craigslist.

how do you "bondo on" a top tank.

if something runs and rides and is bone stock but not a museum piece, in the current market, it is worth $200 to $600 for the most part.

if it doesnt, one must consider the cost to get it running properly and safely.

one must also consider time spent.

personally, buying a non-running bike to me is like buying a frame with a potentially good set of cases. incredible circumstances aside, i would not pay more than $150-200 for a bike that doesnt run, unless it has non-wear aftermarket parts that i am familiar with

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

> Jason White Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> kd ohio - I hear ya on that... If you're planning to put new top end kit

> on it regardless, does that really impact it much though? Also might be

> a really nice parts bike to consider purchasing if you're able to talk

> it down because it's siezed

I'm just saying if the engine is tied up I won't offer more than $50 for a bike because god only knows how much work its going to need or how bad the engine was abused to cause it to be tied up.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

> alex . Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > baird co Wrote:

>

> > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> > If it's cheap, has parts I want, and I can fix it, I'll buy it.

>

> >

>

> > If it's over-priced, has someone else's idea of "custom," and is spray

>

> > painted flat black with a bondo'd on top tank, I'll just laugh at it

> for

>

> > the year or so it sits on Craigslist.

>

> how do you "bondo on" a top tank.

>

> if something runs and rides and is bone stock but not a museum piece, in

> the current market, it is worth $200 to $600 for the most part.

>

> if it doesnt, one must consider the cost to get it running properly and

> safely.

>

> one must also consider time spent.

>

> personally, buying a non-running bike to me is like buying a frame with

> a potentially good set of cases. incredible circumstances aside, i

> would not pay more than $150-200 for a bike that doesnt run, unless it

> has non-wear aftermarket parts that i am familiar with

Good points... Like buying a frame w/ potential upside - I like thinking of it like that as well

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

i'm too the point where i'm super picky, i only buy 3-5 bikes a year now and i only grab them when they are incredible deals.

if you're doing something custom you are buying a frame, tank, wheels, and core engine so get the cheapest you can find and haggle like crazy over bad paint, tore up seat, etc.

if you're buying a bike you want to keep stock ish or have as a rider, buy the nicest bike you can afford. the difference between a minty 400 bike and a 200 dollar junker is usually 4-500 bucks worth of parts not including labor to get it up to speed.

tires almost always need replaced, along with cables, chains, petcock, carb rebuild, so ignore that stuff and focus on the stuff that can't easily be replaced like paint, chrome, general wear-and-tear.

i've only bought one running moped in my whole life- and even that one ran really bad when i got it- they are always cheaper not running. you pay a huge premium for 'hop on and ride' vs 'needs 3 hours of work to hop on and ride'

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

to the point where I kinda assume I'm replacing everything wear - cables tires etc and probably going to tryn do something funny with the frame and engine. If I'm looking at buying a bike today the main considerations are what is on it already and what parts I have spare laying about. I got lots hobbit, v1, e50 and sachs stuff, but not much tomos junk.

And of course what Ive got time for. I'm not really looking to rehash old platforms unless it's to flip it. So I'll buy Hondas or e50s just for a cleanup and sell. If theyre not running but have been kitted - those are my favorites. You can buy em cheap when someone gives up cuz they couldn't tune it, salvage all the performance parts and resell those - hook other folks up with discounted performance parts, and then convert the bike back to running stock with spare parts and get it on the market. Lets you hook someone up with a cheap bike, hook someone else up with cheap performance parts, save it all from becoming scrap and still come out a little bit ahead!

if it's a bike for me, #1 concern is what engine's on it, I'm curious to play with trac, indian, maybe batavus, maybe bottom of that list a derbi - stuff I'm less familiar with, new experience, learning. all the other parts are replaceable. I'm in it for engine 1st and it can go on whatever dumb shit.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Will, youve been in ohio for a while now.

I bet if you check your garage, a lot of tomos has leaked in by now

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

pEDALS...

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Chöschi21 C.K. /

> Ken Durham Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> > Jason White Wrote:

>

> > -------------------------------------------------------

>

> > kd ohio - I hear ya on that... If you're planning to put new top end

> kit

>

> > on it regardless, does that really impact it much though? Also might

> be

>

> > a really nice parts bike to consider purchasing if you're able to talk

>

> > it down because it's siezed

>

> I'm just saying if the engine is tied up I won't offer more than $50 for

> a bike because god only knows how much work its going to need or how bad

> the engine was abused to cause it to be tied up.

I mean, it depends, it its in mint condition and the Engine is seized i dont think you would only pay 50 for it, an Engine can be Reubilt quite easily and wond cost you an Arm and a Leg to repair, a lot if seized and "Rebuild needing" engines only need a little bit of Time, Bearings, Seals and Oil, maybe a Cylinder and Piston, but a lot of times the Crank and Transmission is fine.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

You're so on it. Right now I'm fucking with garelli vip because I'm so bored

> Born to be WillD Wrote:

> -------------------------------------------------------

> to the point where I kinda assume I'm replacing everything wear - cables

> tires etc and probably going to tryn do something funny with the frame

> and engine. If I'm looking at buying a bike today the main

> considerations are what is on it already and what parts I have spare

> laying about. I got lots hobbit, v1, e50 and sachs stuff, but not much

> tomos junk.

>

> And of course what Ive got time for. I'm not really looking to rehash

> old platforms unless it's to flip it. So I'll buy Hondas or e50s just

> for a cleanup and sell. If theyre not running but have been kitted -

> those are my favorites. You can buy em cheap when someone gives up cuz

> they couldn't tune it, salvage all the performance parts and resell

> those - hook other folks up with discounted performance parts, and then

> convert the bike back to running stock with spare parts and get it on

> the market. Lets you hook someone up with a cheap bike, hook someone

> else up with cheap performance parts, save it all from becoming scrap

> and still come out a little bit ahead!

>

> if it's a bike for me, #1 concern is what engine's on it, I'm curious to

> play with trac, indian, maybe batavus, maybe bottom of that list a derbi

> - stuff I'm less familiar with, new experience, learning. all the other

> parts are replaceable. I'm in it for engine 1st and it can go on

> whatever dumb shit.

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Nothing mechanical is a deal breaker for me since even a total engine swap takes 30 minutes. I am all about cosmetics and rarity. Everyone has their own set of preferences

Re: Considerations with buying old moped

Dirty30 Dillon /

If there is a bike I want, first assessment is whether or not the completed end product will be something worth keeping, or something I know I will sell.

If it's something I will keep (due to rarity, etc.) than I will usually be willing to overlook multiple serious flaws.

If it's something I know for a FACT that I will sell, than I don't wanna have to do all that work. If I were going to buy a Maxi today, you bet your ass it better not have a rusty tank or frame issues of any kind. Like WillD said, you have to know that any bike you put time into, you will never recoup that value back via resale.

Much like personal relationships, only put your energy into the important ones.

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