Re: Dr. Watson and James's 'fine kettle of fish'

Ron Brown /
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James,

I have mentioned before in the forum that a "partial" or "soft" seize is highly unlikely if you are able to continue riding and especially if you can shut down to idle and it does not immediately stop.

The nature of an engine seizure is that the piston gets too large for the cylinder bore due to exessive heat (it could be out of spec if new). When this begins to happen, resistance to the engine turning is applied where it can have the most effect, at the piston. This makes idling out of the question as there is not enough power at idle to overcome the friction. As soon as the piston begins to seize, the friction in the cylinder increases the piston temperature so rapidly that under normal circumstances the engine locks up almost instantly causing pucker marks on the seat as the rider attempts to keep the ped under control with the rear wheel locked.

Typically, the only way a partial seize happens, is when going fast with a closed throttle, as in down hill or slowing for a corner. The problem here is caused by lack of lubrication and can sumetimes be avoided by opening the throttle when you feel the engine tighten up, but you don't have much time.

Ron

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